Bashir forms panel to probe Sudan protest violence - The East African

Bashir forms panel to probe Sudan protest violence

Tuesday January 1 2019

omar bashir

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir delivers a speech on December 31, 2018, a day before the country's 63rd independence day, at the presidential palace in Khartoum. The president ordered authorities on January 1, 2019, to set up a fact-finding committee to investigate violence during anti-government protests that have rocked the nation. PHOTO | ASHRAF SHAZLY | AFP 

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Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir ordered authorities on Tuesday to set up a fact-finding committee to investigate violence during anti-government protests that have rocked the country, state media reported.

At least 19 people have been killed and hundreds wounded during the protests that erupted in cities, including the capital Khartoum, on December 19 after a government decision to hike the price of bread.

Human rights group Amnesty International has put the death toll at 37.

"President Omar al-Bashir has ordered the setting up of a fact-finding committee headed by the justice minister to look into the incidents of the past few days," state news agency SUNA reported quoting a presidential decree.

The government raised the price of a loaf of bread from one Sudanese pound to three (from about two to six US cents).

The ensuing protests quickly evolved into anti-government rallies in Khartoum and several other cities.

In the initial days of the protests, several buildings and offices of Bashir's ruling National Congress Party were torched by protesters.

Riot police have managed to disperse the rallies so far, while security agents have arrested several opposition leaders and activists in a crackdown on suspected organisers.

Sudan is facing an acute foreign exchange crisis and soaring inflation despite Washington lifting an economic embargo in October 2017.

The foreign exchange crisis has steadily escalated since Sudan's partition in 2011, when South Sudan broke away, taking with it the bulk of oil revenues.

Inflation is currently running at 70 percent and the Sudanese pound has plunged in value, while shortages of bread and fuel have hit several cities.

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