Before Israel, Jews considered settling in western Kenya - The East African

Before Israel, Jews considered settling in western Kenya

Saturday September 5 2015

This picture dated May 1941 shows foreign Jews,

This picture dated May 1941 shows foreign Jews, especially Polish Jews, get off the train in Pithiviers, France. More than 3,000 Jews where arrested by the Paris police and imprisoned in the transit camps of Pithiviers. Inset, British East Africa Protectorate. PHOTOS | AFP | FILE 

By KEVIN J. KELLEY

In a little-known episode in East Africa’s history, advocates of a Jewish homeland decided 112 years ago to authorise an expedition to today’s Kenya in response to a British proposal to establish a “Jewish territory” on the Uasin Gishu Plateau.

Meeting in Switzerland, the Sixth Zionist Congress voted 295-178 on August 26, 1903, to send this “investigatory commission” to an area bounded by Lake Nakuru, Kisumu, Mount Elgon and the equator.

Earlier that same year, Colonial Secretary Joseph Chamberlain had suggested to Zionist leader Theodor Herzl that this roughly 16,300-square-km portion of the British East Africa Protectorate could be designated for Jewish settlement. Chamberlain, who had recently visited the area, said the plateau had “an excellent climate suitable for white people.”

The territory would be locally administered by a “Jewish official” and be g/comment/Kenya-is-slouching-towards-Gehenna-to-meet-its-doom/434750-5121258-ba5rnw/index.html">Kenya is slouching towards Gehenna to meet its doom

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  • Before Israel, Jews considered settling in western Kenya

    Saturday September 5 2015

    This picture dated May 1941 shows foreign Jews,

    This picture dated May 1941 shows foreign Jews, especially Polish Jews, get off the train in Pithiviers, France. More than 3,000 Jews where arrested by the Paris police and imprisoned in the transit camps of Pithiviers. Inset, British East Africa Protectorate. PHOTOS | AFP | FILE 

    By KEVIN J. KELLEY

    In a little-known episode in East Africa’s history, advocates of a Jewish homeland decided 112 years ago to authorise an expedition to today’s Kenya in response to a British proposal to establish a “Jewish territory” on the Uasin Gishu Plateau.

    Meeting in Switzerland, the Sixth Zionist Congress voted 295-178 on August 26, 1903, to send this “investigatory commission” to an area bounded by Lake Nakuru, Kisumu, Mount Elgon and the equator.

    Earlier that same year, Colonial Secretary Joseph Chamberlain had suggested to Zionist leader Theodor Herzl that this roughly 16,300-square-km portion of the British East Africa Protectorate could be designated for Jewish settlement. Chamberlain, who had recently visited the area, said the plateau had “an excellent climate suitable for white people.”

    The territory would be locally administered by a “Jewish official” and be g/comment/Kenya-is-slouching-towards-Gehenna-to-meet-its-doom/434750-5121258-ba5rnw/index.html">Kenya is slouching towards Gehenna to meet its doom

  • Science & Health
  • Magazine
  • Sports
  • Rest of Africa
  • Before Israel, Jews considered settling in western Kenya

    Saturday September 5 2015

    This picture dated May 1941 shows foreign Jews,

    This picture dated May 1941 shows foreign Jews, especially Polish Jews, get off the train in Pithiviers, France. More than 3,000 Jews where arrested by the Paris police and imprisoned in the transit camps of Pithiviers. Inset, British East Africa Protectorate. PHOTOS | AFP | FILE 

    By KEVIN J. KELLEY

    In a little-known episode in East Africa’s history, advocates of a Jewish homeland decided 112 years ago to authorise an expedition to today’s Kenya in response to a British proposal to establish a “Jewish territory” on the Uasin Gishu Plateau.

    Meeting in Switzerland, the Sixth Zionist Congress voted 295-178 on August 26, 1903, to send this “investigatory commission” to an area bounded by Lake Nakuru, Kisumu, Mount Elgon and the equator.

    Earlier that same year, Colonial Secretary Joseph Chamberlain had suggested to Zionist leader Theodor Herzl that this roughly 16,300-square-km portion of the British East Africa Protectorate could be designated for Jewish settlement. Chamberlain, who had recently visited the area, said the plateau had “an excellent climate suitable for white people.”

    The territory would be locally administered by a “Jewish official” and be g