Why does the need to stay in power generate conflicts in East Africa?

Tuesday October 10 2017

In Uganda, since the overthrow of King Mutesa II of Buganda in 1966 by Milton Obote and Iddi Amin’s coup in 1973, peaceful transfer of power has remained elusive. ILLUSTRATION | JOHN NYANGAH

In Uganda, since the overthrow of King Mutesa II of Buganda in 1966 by Milton Obote and Iddi Amin’s coup in 1973, peaceful transfer of power has remained elusive. ILLUSTRATION | JOHN NYANGAH 

By CHRISTOPHER KAYUMBA
More by this Author

Recently, two journalists from different media houses called me seeking a comment on the probable effect of the current political stalemate in Uganda and Kenya on the East African Political Federation.

In particular, the journalists sought to know how the perennial instability in the EAC countries might affect the viability of the political federation.

I told them that that while the idea of a political federation is superb, actualising it is still a long way away because of contradictions within these countries; unresolved political differences between some leaders; divergent political systems; conflicts over trade including restrictions on free movement of people and goods.

Af

Why does the need to stay in power generate conflicts in East Africa?

Tuesday October 10 2017

In Uganda, since the overthrow of King Mutesa II of Buganda in 1966 by Milton Obote and Iddi Amin’s coup in 1973, peaceful transfer of power has remained elusive. ILLUSTRATION | JOHN NYANGAH

In Uganda, since the overthrow of King Mutesa II of Buganda in 1966 by Milton Obote and Iddi Amin’s coup in 1973, peaceful transfer of power has remained elusive. ILLUSTRATION | JOHN NYANGAH 

By CHRISTOPHER KAYUMBA
More by this Author

Recently, two journalists from different media houses called me seeking a comment on the probable effect of the current political stalemate in Uganda and Kenya on the East African Political Federation.

In particular, the journalists sought to know how the perennial instability in the EAC countries might affect the viability of the political federation.

I told them that that while the idea of a political federation is superb, actualising it is still a long way away because of contradictions within these countries; unresolved political differences between some leaders; divergent political systems; conflicts over trade including restrictions on free movement of people and goods.

Af

Why does the need to stay in power generate conflicts in East Africa?

Tuesday October 10 2017

In Uganda, since the overthrow of King Mutesa II of Buganda in 1966 by Milton Obote and Iddi Amin’s coup in 1973, peaceful transfer of power has remained elusive. ILLUSTRATION | JOHN NYANGAH

In Uganda, since the overthrow of King Mutesa II of Buganda in 1966 by Milton Obote and Iddi Amin’s coup in 1973, peaceful transfer of power has remained elusive. ILLUSTRATION | JOHN NYANGAH 

By CHRISTOPHER KAYUMBA
More by this Author

Recently, two journalists from different media houses called me seeking a comment on the probable effect of the current political stalemate in Uganda and Kenya on the East African Political Federation.

In particular, the journalists sought to know how the perennial instability in the EAC countries might affect the viability of the political federation.

I told them that that while the idea of a political federation is superb, actualising it is still a long way away because of contradictions within these countries; unresolved political differences between some leaders; divergent political systems; conflicts over trade including restrictions on free movement of people and goods.

Af