The argument for economic democracy before political freedom

Wednesday November 8 2017

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore look over the city-state's financial district from a rooftop swimming pool. 5.5 million Singaporeans with a GDP of $297 billion (2016) and a GDP income per capita of $54,000 are worth much more than the 170 million East Africans with a combined GDP of $155 billion and GDP per capita of only $911. FILE PHOTO | AFP 

By TEDDY SSSEZI-CHEEYE
More by this Author

Will the different brands of “democracy” practised in the region achieve an East African political federation, or is it another political hibernation characteristic of most African countries?

Burundi thus has “anarchical winner-takes all democracy.”

It lacks a strong man like President Paul Kagame of Rwanda to create the kind of political and security environment that allows maximum production of goods and provision of services, in order to be able to collect some taxes to run the state. Rwanda has a “status quo democracy” to guard against a repeat of the genocides of 1959 and 1994.

Tanzania has “a socialistic inward-looking democracy” wary of the greedy capitalists especially from neighbouring Kenya whom it suspects of a desire to grab its land.

Tanzania sees Kenya as the hub of global capitalist exploitation with more than 200 multinationals of which 20 have Nairobi for regional headquarters.

In addition, the Tanzanian leadership venerates Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, their founding father. The Tanzania leadership knows that if Nyerere were still alive he would have asked President Robert Mugabe and President Yoweri Museveni to step down as he did President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia.

Accordingly, the Tanzania leadership may not be keen to be politically yoked with Museveni, whom they see as a dictator.

Uganda has “a voter-buying democracy.” Once President Museveni spends his hundreds of billions of obsolescent Uganda shillings to get the changes he wants in the Constitution that get him elected every five years, he has no obligation to give service to the voters because they have sold their souls to him in the first place.

Kenya has “an inclusive economic democracy” that holds that as people become prosperous they became more united and democratic as well.

The fundamental point with an inclusive economic democracy is that it has to deliver services and goods in order to be popularly elected.

The unfortunate thing with the Kenya and Tanzania type of democracy is that their political democratisation is at the same leve class="btn-slide">

The argument for economic democracy before political freedom

Wednesday November 8 2017

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore look over the city-state's financial district from a rooftop swimming pool. 5.5 million Singaporeans with a GDP of $297 billion (2016) and a GDP income per capita of $54,000 are worth much more than the 170 million East Africans with a combined GDP of $155 billion and GDP per capita of only $911. FILE PHOTO | AFP 

By TEDDY SSSEZI-CHEEYE
More by this Author

Will the different brands of “democracy” practised in the region achieve an East African political federation, or is it another political hibernation characteristic of most African countries?

Burundi thus has “anarchical winner-takes all democracy.”

It lacks a strong man like President Paul Kagame of Rwanda to create the kind of political and security environment that allows maximum production of goods and provision of services, in order to be able to collect some taxes to run the state. Rwanda has a “status quo democracy” to guard against a repeat of the genocides of 1959 and 1994.

Tanzania has “a socialistic inward-looking democracy” wary of the greedy capitalists especially from neighbouring Kenya whom it suspects of a desire to grab its land.

Tanzania sees Kenya as the hub of global capitalist exploitation with more than 200 multinationals of which 20 have Nairobi for regional headquarters.

In addition, the Tanzanian leadership venerates Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, their founding father. The Tanzania leadership knows that if Nyerere were still alive he would have asked President Robert Mugabe and President Yoweri Museveni to step down as he did President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia.

Accordingly, the Tanzania leadership may not be keen to be politically yoked with Museveni, whom they see as a dictator.

Uganda has “a voter-buying democracy.” Once President Museveni spends his hundreds of billions of obsolescent Uganda shillings to get the changes he wants in the Constitution that get him elected every five years, he has no obligation to give service to the voters because they have sold their souls to him in the first place.

Kenya has “an inclusive economic democracy” that holds that as people become prosperous they became more united and democratic as well.

The fundamental point with an inclusive economic democracy is that it has to deliver services and goods in order to be popularly elected.

The unfortunate thing with the Kenya and Tanzania type of democracy is that their political democratisation is at the same leve class="btn-slide">

The argument for economic democracy before political freedom

Wednesday November 8 2017

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore look over the city-state's financial district from a rooftop swimming pool. 5.5 million Singaporeans with a GDP of $297 billion (2016) and a GDP income per capita of $54,000 are worth much more than the 170 million East Africans with a combined GDP of $155 billion and GDP per capita of only $911. FILE PHOTO | AFP 

By TEDDY SSSEZI-CHEEYE
More by this Author

Will the different brands of “democracy” practised in the region achieve an East African political federation, or is it another political hibernation characteristic of most African countries?

Burundi thus has “anarchical winner-takes all democracy.”

It lacks a strong man like President Paul Kagame of Rwanda to create the kind of political and security environment that allows maximum production of goods and provision of services, in order to be able to collect some taxes to run the state. Rwanda has a “status quo democracy” to guard against a repeat of the genocides of 1959 and 1994.

Tanzania has “a socialistic inward-looking democracy” wary of the greedy capitalists especially from neighbouring Kenya whom it suspects of a desire to grab its land.

Tanzania sees Kenya as the hub of global capitalist exploitation with more than 200 multinationals of which 20 have Nairobi for regional headquarters.

In addition, the Tanzanian leadership venerates Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, their founding father. The Tanzania leadership knows that if Nyerere were still alive he would have asked President Robert Mugabe and President Yoweri Museveni to step down as he did President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia.

Accordingly, the Tanzania leadership may not be keen to be politically yoked with Museveni, whom they see as a dictator.

Uganda has “a voter-buying democracy.” Once President Museveni spends his hundreds of billions of obsolescent Uganda shillings to get the changes he wants in the Constitution that get him elected every five years, he has no obligation to give service to the voters because they have sold their souls to him in the first place.

Kenya has “an inclusive economic democracy” that holds that as people become prosperous they became more united and democratic as well.

The fundamental point with an inclusive economic democracy is that it has to deliver services and goods in order to be popularly elected.

The unfortunate thing with the Kenya and Tanzania type of democracy is that their political democratisation is at the same leve class="btn-slide">

The argument for economic democracy before political freedom

Wednesday November 8 2017

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore look over the city-state's financial district from a rooftop swimming pool. 5.5 million Singaporeans with a GDP of $297 billion (2016) and a GDP income per capita of $54,000 are worth much more than the 170 million East Africans with a combined GDP of $155 billion and GDP per capita of only $911. FILE PHOTO | AFP 

By TEDDY SSSEZI-CHEEYE
More by this Author

Will the different brands of “democracy” practised in the region achieve an East African political federation, or is it another political hibernation characteristic of most African countries?

Burundi thus has “anarchical winner-takes all democracy.”

It lacks a strong man like President Paul Kagame of Rwanda to create the kind of political and security environment that allows maximum production of goods and provision of services, in order to be able to collect some taxes to run the state. Rwanda has a “status quo democracy” to guard against a repeat of the genocides of 1959 and 1994.

Tanzania has “a socialistic inward-looking democracy” wary of the greedy capitalists especially from neighbouring Kenya whom it suspects of a desire to grab its land.

Tanzania sees Kenya as the hub of global capitalist exploitation with more than 200 multinationals of which 20 have Nairobi for regional headquarters.

In addition, the Tanzanian leadership venerates Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, their founding father. The Tanzania leadership knows that if Nyerere were still alive he would have asked President Robert Mugabe and President Yoweri Museveni to step down as he did President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia.

Accordingly, the Tanzania leadership may not be keen to be politically yoked with Museveni, whom they see as a dictator.

Uganda has “a voter-buying democracy.” Once President Museveni spends his hundreds of billions of obsolescent Uganda shillings to get the changes he wants in the Constitution that get him elected every five years, he has no obligation to give service to the voters because they have sold their souls to him in the first place.

Kenya has “an inclusive economic democracy” that holds that as people become prosperous they became more united and democratic as well.

The fundamental point with an inclusive economic democracy is that it has to deliver services and goods in order to be popularly elected.

The unfortunate thing with the Kenya and Tanzania type of democracy is that their political democratisation is at the same leve class="btn-slide">

The argument for economic democracy before political freedom

Wednesday November 8 2017

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore look over the city-state's financial district from a rooftop swimming pool. 5.5 million Singaporeans with a GDP of $297 billion (2016) and a GDP income per capita of $54,000 are worth much more than the 170 million East Africans with a combined GDP of $155 billion and GDP per capita of only $911. FILE PHOTO | AFP 

By TEDDY SSSEZI-CHEEYE
More by this Author

Will the different brands of “democracy” practised in the region achieve an East African political federation, or is it another political hibernation characteristic of most African countries?

Burundi thus has “anarchical winner-takes all democracy.”

It lacks a strong man like President Paul Kagame of Rwanda to create the kind of political and security environment that allows maximum production of goods and provision of services, in order to be able to collect some taxes to run the state. Rwanda has a “status quo democracy” to guard against a repeat of the genocides of 1959 and 1994.

Tanzania has “a socialistic inward-looking democracy” wary of the greedy capitalists especially from neighbouring Kenya whom it suspects of a desire to grab its land.

Tanzania sees Kenya as the hub of global capitalist exploitation with more than 200 multinationals of which 20 have Nairobi for regional headquarters.

In addition, the Tanzanian leadership venerates Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, their founding father. The Tanzania leadership knows that if Nyerere were still alive he would have asked President Robert Mugabe and President Yoweri Museveni to step down as he did President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia.

Accordingly, the Tanzania leadership may not be keen to be politically yoked with Museveni, whom they see as a dictator.

Uganda has “a voter-buying democracy.” Once President Museveni spends his hundreds of billions of obsolescent Uganda shillings to get the changes he wants in the Constitution that get him elected every five years, he has no obligation to give service to the voters because they have sold their souls to him in the first place.

Kenya has “an inclusive economic democracy” that holds that as people become prosperous they became more united and democratic as well.

The fundamental point with an inclusive economic democracy is that it has to deliver services and goods in order to be popularly elected.

The unfortunate thing with the Kenya and Tanzania type of democracy is that their political democratisation is at the same leve class="btn-slide">

The argument for economic democracy before political freedom

Wednesday November 8 2017

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore look over the city-state's financial district from a rooftop swimming pool. 5.5 million Singaporeans with a GDP of $297 billion (2016) and a GDP income per capita of $54,000 are worth much more than the 170 million East Africans with a combined GDP of $155 billion and GDP per capita of only $911. FILE PHOTO | AFP 

By TEDDY SSSEZI-CHEEYE
More by this Author

Will the different brands of “democracy” practised in the region achieve an East African political federation, or is it another political hibernation characteristic of most African countries?

Burundi thus has “anarchical winner-takes all democracy.”

It lacks a strong man like President Paul Kagame of Rwanda to create the kind of political and security environment that allows maximum production of goods and provision of services, in order to be able to collect some taxes to run the state. Rwanda has a “status quo democracy” to guard against a repeat of the genocides of 1959 and 1994.

Tanzania has “a socialistic inward-looking democracy” wary of the greedy capitalists especially from neighbouring Kenya whom it suspects of a desire to grab its land.

Tanzania sees Kenya as the hub of global capitalist exploitation with more than 200 multinationals of which 20 have Nairobi for regional headquarters.

In addition, the Tanzanian leadership venerates Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, their founding father. The Tanzania leadership knows that if Nyerere were still alive he would have asked President Robert Mugabe and President Yoweri Museveni to step down as he did President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia.

Accordingly, the Tanzania leadership may not be keen to be politically yoked with Museveni, whom they see as a dictator.

Uganda has “a voter-buying democracy.” Once President Museveni spends his hundreds of billions of obsolescent Uganda shillings to get the changes he wants in the Constitution that get him elected every five years, he has no obligation to give service to the voters because they have sold their souls to him in the first place.

Kenya has “an inclusive economic democracy” that holds that as people become prosperous they became more united and democratic as well.

The fundamental point with an inclusive economic democracy is that it has to deliver services and goods in order to be popularly elected.

The unfortunate thing with the Kenya and Tanzania type of democracy is that their political democratisation is at the same leve class="btn-slide">

The argument for economic democracy before political freedom

Wednesday November 8 2017

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore look over the city-state's financial district from a rooftop swimming pool. 5.5 million Singaporeans with a GDP of $297 billion (2016) and a GDP income per capita of $54,000 are worth much more than the 170 million East Africans with a combined GDP of $155 billion and GDP per capita of only $911. FILE PHOTO | AFP 

By TEDDY SSSEZI-CHEEYE
More by this Author

Will the different brands of “democracy” practised in the region achieve an East African political federation, or is it another political hibernation characteristic of most African countries?

Burundi thus has “anarchical winner-takes all democracy.”

It lacks a strong man like President Paul Kagame of Rwanda to create the kind of political and security environment that allows maximum production of goods and provision of services, in order to be able to collect some taxes to run the state. Rwanda has a “status quo democracy” to guard against a repeat of the genocides of 1959 and 1994.

Tanzania has “a socialistic inward-looking democracy” wary of the greedy capitalists especially from neighbouring Kenya whom it suspects of a desire to grab its land.

Tanzania sees Kenya as the hub of global capitalist exploitation with more than 200 multinationals of which 20 have Nairobi for regional headquarters.

In addition, the Tanzanian leadership venerates Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, their founding father. The Tanzania leadership knows that if Nyerere were still alive he would have asked President Robert Mugabe and President Yoweri Museveni to step down as he did President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia.

Accordingly, the Tanzania leadership may not be keen to be politically yoked with Museveni, whom they see as a dictator.

Uganda has “a voter-buying democracy.” Once President Museveni spends his hundreds of billions of obsolescent Uganda shillings to get the changes he wants in the Constitution that get him elected every five years, he has no obligation to give service to the voters because they have sold their souls to him in the first place.

Kenya has “an inclusive economic democracy” that holds that as people become prosperous they became more united and democratic as well.

The fundamental point with an inclusive economic democracy is that it has to deliver services and goods in order to be popularly elected.

The unfortunate thing with the Kenya and Tanzania type of democracy is that their political democratisation is at the same leve class="btn-slide">

The argument for economic democracy before political freedom

Wednesday November 8 2017

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore look over the city-state's financial district from a rooftop swimming pool. 5.5 million Singaporeans with a GDP of $297 billion (2016) and a GDP income per capita of $54,000 are worth much more than the 170 million East Africans with a combined GDP of $155 billion and GDP per capita of only $911. FILE PHOTO | AFP 

By TEDDY SSSEZI-CHEEYE
More by this Author

Will the different brands of “democracy” practised in the region achieve an East African political federation, or is it another political hibernation characteristic of most African countries?

Burundi thus has “anarchical winner-takes all democracy.”

It lacks a strong man like President Paul Kagame of Rwanda to create the kind of political and security environment that allows maximum production of goods and provision of services, in order to be able to collect some taxes to run the state. Rwanda has a “status quo democracy” to guard against a repeat of the genocides of 1959 and 1994.

Tanzania has “a socialistic inward-looking democracy” wary of the greedy capitalists especially from neighbouring Kenya whom it suspects of a desire to grab its land.

Tanzania sees Kenya as the hub of global capitalist exploitation with more than 200 multinationals of which 20 have Nairobi for regional headquarters.

In addition, the Tanzanian leadership venerates Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, their founding father. The Tanzania leadership knows that if Nyerere were still alive he would have asked President Robert Mugabe and President Yoweri Museveni to step down as he did President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia.

Accordingly, the Tanzania leadership may not be keen to be politically yoked with Museveni, whom they see as a dictator.

Uganda has “a voter-buying democracy.” Once President Museveni spends his hundreds of billions of obsolescent Uganda shillings to get the changes he wants in the Constitution that get him elected every five years, he has no obligation to give service to the voters because they have sold their souls to him in the first place.

Kenya has “an inclusive economic democracy” that holds that as people become prosperous they became more united and democratic as well.

The fundamental point with an inclusive economic democracy is that it has to deliver services and goods in order to be popularly elected.

The unfortunate thing with the Kenya and Tanzania type of democracy is that their political democratisation is at the same leve class="btn-slide">

The argument for economic democracy before political freedom

Wednesday November 8 2017

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in

Guests at the Marina Bay Sands hotel in Singapore look over the city-state's financial district from a rooftop swimming pool. 5.5 million Singaporeans with a GDP of $297 billion (2016) and a GDP income per capita of $54,000 are worth much more than the 170 million East Africans with a combined GDP of $155 billion and GDP per capita of only $911. FILE PHOTO | AFP 

By TEDDY SSSEZI-CHEEYE
More by this Author

Will the different brands of “democracy” practised in the region achieve an East African political federation, or is it another political hibernation characteristic of most African countries?

Burundi thus has “anarchical winner-takes all democracy.”

It lacks a strong man like President Paul Kagame of Rwanda to create the kind of political and security environment that allows maximum production of goods and provision of services, in order to be able to collect some taxes to run the state. Rwanda has a “status quo democracy” to guard against a repeat of the genocides of 1959 and 1994.

Tanzania has “a socialistic inward-looking democracy” wary of the greedy capitalists especially from neighbouring Kenya whom it suspects of a desire to grab its land.

Tanzania sees Kenya as the hub of global capitalist exploitation with more than 200 multinationals of which 20 have Nairobi for regional headquarters.

In addition, the Tanzanian leadership venerates Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, their founding father. The Tanzania leadership knows that if Nyerere were still alive he would have asked President Robert Mugabe and President Yoweri Museveni to step down as he did President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia.

Accordingly, the Tanzania leadership may not be keen to be politically yoked with Museveni, whom they see as a dictator.

Uganda has “a voter-buying democracy.” Once President Museveni spends his hundreds of billions of obsolescent Uganda shillings to get the changes he wants in the Constitution that get him elected every five years, he has no obligation to give service to the voters because they have sold their souls to him in the first place.

Kenya has “an inclusive economic democracy” that holds that as people become prosperous they became more united and democratic as well.

The fundamental point with an inclusive economic democracy is that it has to deliver services and goods in order to be popularly elected.

The unfortunate thing with the Kenya and Tanzania type of democracy is that their political democratisation is at the same leve