Tanzania policy of kicking pregnant girls out of school is shameful

Tuesday February 14 2017

Thousands of girls in Tanzania leave school each year because due to pregnancy, says a global report on barriers to education. ILLUSTRATION | FILE

Thousands of girls in Tanzania leave school each year because due to pregnancy, says a global report on barriers to education. ILLUSTRATION | FILE 

By Agnes Odhiambo

I liked to study so that I could have a broad mind. There was nothing I didn’t like to study. I had a dream of finishing school and going on to college, graduating and finding work.”

Like millions of adolescents in Tanzania, Imani, from Mwanza in northwestern Tanzania, wanted to study hard and to graduate, find a job, and support herself and her family.

From the age of 14, she travelled more than an hour and a half every morning to reach her secondary school. It was tiring, but Imani was motivated by her dream of becoming an accountant.

Her dreams were shattered at the age of 16, when a secondary school teacher that her parents hired to tutor her sexually abused her. He disappeared after Imani informed him she was pregnant. She was expelled from school after a routine mandatory monthly pregnancy test.

A new Human Rights Watch report — I Had a Dream to Finish School: Barriers to Secondary Education in Tanzania — takes a hard look at secondary education in Tanzania. Over five million children aged 7 to 17 are out of school, including nearly 1.5 million of lower secondary school age.

Formal vocational training is often unavailable. In 2013, Tanzania ranked 159th out of 187 in the United Nations’ global education index, which measures mean years of schooling and expected years of schooling.

Tanzanian children miss out on education for a number of reasons, including financial problems, long distances to schools, endemic corporal punishment, or because they failed the primary school-leaving exam.

Government policy does not allow students to retake the ex/div>

Tanzania policy of kicking pregnant girls out of school is shameful

Tuesday February 14 2017

Thousands of girls in Tanzania leave school each year because due to pregnancy, says a global report on barriers to education. ILLUSTRATION | FILE

Thousands of girls in Tanzania leave school each year because due to pregnancy, says a global report on barriers to education. ILLUSTRATION | FILE 

By Agnes Odhiambo

I liked to study so that I could have a broad mind. There was nothing I didn’t like to study. I had a dream of finishing school and going on to college, graduating and finding work.”

Like millions of adolescents in Tanzania, Imani, from Mwanza in northwestern Tanzania, wanted to study hard and to graduate, find a job, and support herself and her family.

From the age of 14, she travelled more than an hour and a half every morning to reach her secondary school. It was tiring, but Imani was motivated by her dream of becoming an accountant.

Her dreams were shattered at the age of 16, when a secondary school teacher that her parents hired to tutor her sexually abused her. He disappeared after Imani informed him she was pregnant. She was expelled from school after a routine mandatory monthly pregnancy test.

A new Human Rights Watch report — I Had a Dream to Finish School: Barriers to Secondary Education in Tanzania — takes a hard look at secondary education in Tanzania. Over five million children aged 7 to 17 are out of school, including nearly 1.5 million of lower secondary school age.

Formal vocational training is often unavailable. In 2013, Tanzania ranked 159th out of 187 in the United Nations’ global education index, which measures mean years of schooling and expected years of schooling.

Tanzanian children miss out on education for a number of reasons, including financial problems, long distances to schools, endemic corporal punishment, or because they failed the primary school-leaving exam.

Government policy does not allow students to retake the ex/div>

Tanzania policy of kicking pregnant girls out of school is shameful

Tuesday February 14 2017

Thousands of girls in Tanzania leave school each year because due to pregnancy, says a global report on barriers to education. ILLUSTRATION | FILE

Thousands of girls in Tanzania leave school each year because due to pregnancy, says a global report on barriers to education. ILLUSTRATION | FILE 

By Agnes Odhiambo

I liked to study so that I could have a broad mind. There was nothing I didn’t like to study. I had a dream of finishing school and going on to college, graduating and finding work.”

Like millions of adolescents in Tanzania, Imani, from Mwanza in northwestern Tanzania, wanted to study hard and to graduate, find a job, and support herself and her family.

From the age of 14, she travelled more than an hour and a half every morning to reach her secondary school. It was tiring, but Imani was motivated by her dream of becoming an accountant.

Her dreams were shattered at the age of 16, when a secondary school teacher that her parents hired to tutor her sexually abused her. He disappeared after Imani informed him she was pregnant. She was expelled from school after a routine mandatory monthly pregnancy test.

A new Human Rights Watch report — I Had a Dream to Finish School: Barriers to Secondary Education in Tanzania — takes a hard look at secondary education in Tanzania. Over five million children aged 7 to 17 are out of school, including nearly 1.5 million of lower secondary school age.

Formal vocational training is often unavailable. In 2013, Tanzania ranked 159th out of 187 in the United Nations’ global education index, which measures mean years of schooling and expected years of schooling.

Tanzanian children miss out on education for a number of reasons, including financial problems, long distances to schools, endemic corporal punishment, or because they failed the primary school-leaving exam.

Government policy does not allow students to retake the ex